Perigord (or The Dordogne for us English folk) is renowned for its fattened up geese and ducks that produce the controversial yet deliciously gourmand foie gras. So off we went in our little car in search of ‘everything duck’!

Our market morning in Perigueux struck gold as we stumbled upon a foie gras tasting with an eccentric gentleman and his farm products. Foie de canard (duck) and foie d’oie (goose) are gourmet rivals with the goose being a more refined taste and certainly more expensive. However it’s nothing to be overly righteous about as the duck variety is more subtle and better suited to some tastes. Like wine, the best is only what you prefer, not what is the most recognised and expensive! This delicate product is produced in a much debated manner, by force feeding the poultry to produce a large, rich and firm liver which is perfectly complimented with raspberries or a sweet white wine.

One in a Million… Foie Gras store
Foie Gras at the Market!

Onwards to Sarlat… Now, if Perigord is the French capital of duck and goose, Sarlat is the crème de la crop and the must-visit city. Without exaggerating even slightly I have never seen so many gourmand shops packed into one tiny golden quaint town! Every place we stop, we without fail enter into a shop of this kind, yet here it was overwhelming to choose amongst the sea of foie gras goodie establishments. We entered a few and also had a tasting of Sarlanoix, an aperitif made of walnuts which would perfectly compliment the sugared walnuts we bought in the market, fresh from the farm!

After an exhausting morning of ‘ooing’ and ‘aaahing’ at hundreds of these products, we stopped for a well earned lunch at a traditional Sarladaise restaurant. Named ‘La Petit Bourie‘ after the little stone huts in the country, this house has been serving locally sourced dishes since 1920. We went for the very reasonable menu (on,y 16 euros!) so as to taste a bit of everything. To start was, surprise surprise, foie gras which melted in the mouth and was given a bit of an extra kick with piment d’Espelette and Guerande sea salt. The main event was confit de canard (duck confit) with Sarladaise potatoes. The duck was perfected down to a tee with crispy skin and fat and melt in the mouth meat, and even the group of chatty old ladies next to us commented on what a treat we were in for! The potatoes are a local speciality (hence the name!) and they, like everything in the area, incorporate poultry as they are initially fried in duck or goose fat with parsley and garlic, then formed into rosti-like paties which are crispy yet fluffy yet oily yet… (mouth watering!)

Confit de Canard

Best meal so far I think, and ten out of ten for value, friendly staff and interest in our tour! I would say that I’m all ducked out, but that I am not! What a fantastically gourmet stop!

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